ABCs of IDA—Gender

ABCs of IDA - Gender

The world today is a better place for women and girls than it was even a few years ago, but not for everyone and not everywhere. This is especially true in the world’s poorest countries, where gaps are great in what women learn, earn, and are taught they can hope to achieve in their lives. As just one example, a 2017 study shows that child marriage is likely to cost trillions of dollars to developing countries by 2030 due to its impacts on fertility, health, education, and earnings, among others. (Download ABCs of IDA - Gender in pdf format.)

Empowering girls and women so they survive childbirth, get a better education, and secure better paying jobs is vital to ending extreme poverty by 2030, boosting shared prosperity, and building resilient communities. It can help set countries on a sustainable path toward more diversified economies, higher productivity, and better prospects for the next generation.

Gender equality is a key priority for the International Development Association (IDA). IDA works to close gender gaps by getting—and keeping—girls in school, helping women gain access to land titles and other vital assets, providing women with training in sustainable farming practices, and ensuring they can obtain financing to start businesses. This helps improve the economic prospects for individuals, families and whole economies. IDA’s work is consistent with the World Bank Group’s Gender Equality Strategy. The strategy focuses on closing persistent gender gaps by leveraging the growing data and evidence about what works in a range of areas—from health and education to access to economic opportunities—all of which pose unique challenges for women in many countries.

IDA is uniquely suited to support gender equality outcomes, which requires integrating work across multiple sectors and sustaining efforts over long periods. Progress on key gender indicators—such as girls’ school enrollment and completion rates, maternal mortality, labor force participation, and asset ownership—also depends on investments in water, sanitation, transport, energy, financial inclusion, and other key enablers such as technology, fertilizers, and skills training.

IDA is uniquely suited to support gender equality outcomes, which requires integrating work across multiple sectors and sustaining efforts over long periods. Progress on key gender indicators—such as girls’ school enrollment and completion rates, maternal mortality, labor force participation, and asset ownership—also depends on investments in water, sanitation, transport, energy, financial inclusion, and other key enablers such as technology, fertilizers, and skills training.

While many agencies address gender inequality through education and health, few can match IDA’s potential to provide complementary support in infrastructure, private sector development, agriculture, and financial services delivery. Many challenges remain, but IDA’s work is yielding results. From 2011 to 2018 for example, more than 657 million people in IDA countries received essential health services. Life expectancy for women in IDA countries is now three years longer than men. In sub-Saharan Africa, girls’ enrollment in primary education increased from 76.1 percent in 2000 to 95.05 percent in 2017.

As the following examples illustrate, IDA is helping close gender gaps in many countries. Be sure to see our other “ABCs” (achievements by country) of IDA, including our work on governance and institution building, climate, jobs and economic transformation, and conflict and fragility at ida.worldbank.org/abcs..


A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z


B

BANGLADESH

  • From 2016 to 2018, 3,500 lecturers were recruited, and 50,000 non-government teachers were accredited, benefiting 1.8 million students. 828,000 of the beneficiaries were girls.
  • 1 million small scale farmers benefited from increased market access in 2018 up from 397,600 in 2015. 33% of the beneficiaries were women. From 2015 to 2018, 165,683 farmers have adopted new agricultural technologies to increase productivity.

C

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

  • From 2017 to 2018, 63,250 displaced people benefited from safety net programs. 60% of the beneficiaries were women. 8,250 households benefited from cash transfers.

CHAD

  • From 2013 to 2018, 371,917 primary school children benefited from improved learning and teaching conditions. Girls accounted for 43%.

COMOROS

  • Between 2015-2018, 26,936 pregnant women, adolescent girls, and children under age 5 received basic nutrition services. During the same period, 4,217 people benefited from social safety net programs. 68% of the beneficiaries were women.

D

DJIBOUTI

  • 96,362 pregnant and lactating women, adolescent girls,, and children under age 5 received basic nutrition services. 69,492 women received antenatal care in 2018 up from 6,100 in 2014.

E

ETHIOPIA

  • 15,525 women successfully completed training in technical, vocational, and entrepreneurship between 2012 and 2018. Their average yearly earnings went up by 28%.
  • 8 million people in rural areas benefited from a safety net program between 2017-2018. 51% of the beneficiaries were women.

G

GHANA

  • 320,000 people in urban areas received access to improved water sources. 112,075 of the beneficiaries were women. 55,701 women were trained in advanced sanitation practices.

GUINEA

  • From 2014 to 2018, 1.8 million people benefited from better technical performance of the national power utility. Women accounted for 52% of the beneficiaries.
  • From 2017-2018, 708,684 people have benefited from a community-supported project that strengthened the local government and improved service delivery in rural communities. 43% of the beneficiaries were women.

H

HONDURAS

  • 16 municipalities implemented disaster risk management and emergency plans between 2012 and 2018, benefiting 214,893 people. Women accounted for 48%.

K

KENYA

  • 1.2 million people were benefited from improved judicial services in 2018, up from 157,000 in 2012. Women accounted for 25%.
  • In 2018, 3 million Nairobi residents benefited from improved street lighting, pedestrian walkways, sewage facilities, and fire stations.

M

MADAGASCAR

  • Between 2015-18, a safety net project for the rural poor benefited 757,317 people. Women accounted for 78%.
  • 71,567 pregnant women, adolescent girls, and children under-five were provided with basic nutrition services between 2015 -18.
  • 286,194 children were immunized,131,431 births were attended by a skilled health professional, and 113,131 pregnant women received antenatal care between 2012-16.

MALAWI

  • Between 2015-2018, 985,635 people benefited from a public works program created after the 2015 floods. 53% of the beneficiaries were women.
  • 10,550 students benefited from a skills development program, between 2013-18. 30% of the beneficiaries were women.

MALI

  • 34,230 youths between the ages of 15 and 35 were trained through a skills development program, from 2014 to 2018. 32% of the beneficiaries were women. During the same period, 4,858 out-of-school youths enrolled in an apprenticeship program. 32 % of the beneficiaries were women.
  • 71,478 households, representing 405,862 people, benefited from direct cash transfers and accompanying measures, between 2015-2018. More than half of the beneficiaries were women and children.

MAURITANIA

  • 29,853 households, representing 197,030 people, benefited from a social cash transfer program (Tekavou), between 2015-2018. 88% of the beneficiaries were women.
  • Between 2014-2018, 13 middle schools and 52 lower secondary schools were built to attract girls; nearly 366,338 primary school teachers were trained; 445,437 study kits were printed and distributed to students in grades 4 and 5 and nearly 50% of the girls transitioned from primary to lower secondary education.

MOZAMBIQUE

  • 1.9 million hectares of land were brought under enhanced biodiversity protection between 2014 and 2018. 68,875 people benefited from tourism related jobs and one-third of the beneficiaries were women.

N

NIGER

  • 828,250 people received access to sustainable water services between 2011-2018. 52% of the beneficiaries were women.
  • From 2011 to 2018, 3.1 million days of temporary employment were created, of which 1.1 million days were for women.
  • From 2013 to 2018, 9,211 youths were benefited from a skills development program; women accounted for 31%.
  • In 2018, 48% of births were attended by a skilled health practitioner up from 25.6% in 2012. Between 2014-2018, 3.8 million women and children received basic reproductive health and nutrition services.

NIGERIA

  • 58,961 youths received cash payment in return for working in a public works program between 2013-2018 40% of the beneficiaries were women. During the same period, 25,000 women received life skills training, 1,000 women graduated from internship programs, and 3,000 women were trained in vocational and entrepreneurial skills.
  • 981,000 poor and vulnerable households received targeted cash transfers, between 2016- 2018. 92% of the beneficiaries were women.

P

PAKISTAN

  • In 2018, 3.6 million pregnant or lactating women, adolescent girls, and children under age 5 received basic nutrition services in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa region and 1.8 million pregnant women received iron and folic acid (IFA) supplements.
  • Between 2014-2018, 1.1 million pregnant women in Balochistan province and 2.2 million pregnant women in Sindh province received IFA supplements.
  • In 2018, 11.4 million women received essential health, nutrition, and population services in Punjab province up from 3.2 million in 2015. During the same period, 2.5 million births were delivered by a health professional up from 1.8 million, and 2.5 million children were immunized up from 1.4 million.
  • Between 2016-2018, 1.2 million people benefited from flood and drought mitigation activities in Sindh province; 50% of the beneficiaries were women.

R

RWANDA

  • 64,862 people were provided with drainage services, between 2016- 2018. 52% of the beneficiaries were women. During the same period, 63 women participated in consultation activities during the project implementation.

S

SENEGAL

  • 155,397 births were delivered by a skilled healthcare professional and 2 million poor people were offered basic health and nutrition services, between 2011-2018.
  • 275,605 women received antenatal care and 2.3 million received health, nutrition, and population services, between 2013 to 2017.
  • Between 2009-2018, 3,200 women were trained in sustainable charcoal production techniques, increasing their revenues and improving their family living conditions. During the same period, the project distributed 306,253 improved stoves benefiting mostly women.

SIERRA LEONE

  • In 2018, 94% of births were delivered by a skilled health professional up from 72% in 2013. During the same period, 84% of pregnant women were attended four or more times by a health professional up from 79%.
  • Between 2013-2018, 1.6 million students benefited from a revitalized education development project and 84% of teachers were trained in improved reading methods. During the same period, 8,100 schools were reopened, and more than 50% of the beneficiaries were women.

SOLOMON ISLANDS

  • 13,000 people from vulnerable communities were employed in construction of community infrastructure generating more than 785,851 days of work, between 2010-2018. 52% of employees were women.

SOUTH SUDAN

  • 53,290 people received cash-for-work, food-for-work, and temporary employment through a public works program between 2015-2018. 4 million days of work were created, and 76% of the beneficiaries were women.

T

TAJIKISTAN

  • In 2018, 1,900 students were enrolled in short-term courses developed in response to labor market demand; 1,040 of the beneficiaries were women.

TANZANIA

  • 1.1 million households benefited from a conditional targeted cash transfer program, between 2012- 18. Women accounted for 52% of the beneficiaries.
  • In 2018, 78% of births were delivered by a health care professional up from 45% in 2014. 61% of the pregnant women attended four or more antenatal care visits up from 41% percent in 2012.

TOGO

  • 49,958 people benefited from a safety net program and 23,725 (48%) of the beneficiaries were women, between 2017-2018. Students in targeted schools with existing meal feeding programs received 5.7 million meals.

U

UGANDA

  • From 2015 to 2018, 2.5 million people accessed basic health and nutrition services. 4.8 million pregnant women received antenatal care. During the same period, 766 health professionals received training and 77 health facilities were constructed, renovated or equipped.
  • Between 2016-2018, 26,400 women were trained in nutrition-sensitive agriculture and 30,469 girls received weekly IFA supplements through their primary school. Percentage of women participating in community-based nutrition activities in project areas increased to 47% from 36% during this period.

Y

YEMEN

  • From 2013 to 2014, 2.35 million people received cash transfers to alleviate a sharp increase in the poverty rate—from 43 percent in 2009 to 55 percent in 2012 following a crisis in Yemen in 2011. More than half of the recipients were women.

Updated as of March 15, 2019